The Labyrinth of Minos or Bullfighting, Cultural Tradition?  

Honorable Mention  (Portfolio-Personal)  TIFA  2020. Japan.

Honorable Mention  (Editorial-Photo Essay)  BIFA 2020. Ungría.
Honorable Mention   (Editorial / Press, Photo Essay / Feacture Story) IPA 2020. USA.
Honorable Mention  (Event, Traditions and Cultures) IPA 2020. USA.

Honorable Mention (Portfolio - Personal)  MIFA 2020. Russia.

SILVER  (Editorial - Photo Essay)  MIFA 2020. Russia.

The photographs in this Series have been edited as a body of a book entitled, The Bull, the Last Gladiator and has obtained:

JURY TOP 5 SELECTION  (Book-Documentary) TIFA 2020. Japan.

Bronze Winner  (Book-Documentary)  TIFA  2020. Japan.

Honorable Mention  (Book-Documentary)  BIFA 2020.  Anointing.

Honorable Mention  (Book - Documentary)  MIFA 2020.  Russia.

Honorable Mention  (Book, Self Published) IPA 2020.  USA

The labyrinth of Minos or Bullfighting; A Cultural Tradition?

The fight in ancient Rome between gladiators as a show began in 264 ac and lasted until its total suspension in 404 d. C. For more than 600 years it was synonymous with celebrations as culture of the territories dominated by Rome. A fight to the death between human beings against dangerous animals as a popular and traditional spectacle.

Bullfighting also with its origins before Christ, has lasted until today with certain changes in some of the countries where it was introduced as a festive cultural event. However, it is very similar to the Roman arena and the confrontation to death between a man and an animal.

Currently these "Cultural Traditions" are still practiced in eight countries: Colombia, Spain, France, Portugal, Mexico, Venezuela, Peru and Ecuador.

Will we continue in the 21st century with cruelty to these animals as a public, popular and traditional celebration, even for minor spectators?

Have we not yet reached the degree of civilization necessary to rectify what is archaic as an understanding of cultural tradition within the public and festive sphere?

Personally, I think it is possible to deal with the Bull without killing him, nor to harm him, and above all, with the respect he deserves. Like the tigers or lions that appear in shows in the great Circuses, being a beautiful presentation for both adults and children.

The fighting in ancient Rome between gladiators as a spectacle began in 264 BC and lasted until its total suspension in 404 AD. C. For more than 600 years it was synonymous with celebrations as culture  of the territories dominated by Rome. A fight to the death between human beings and also against dangerous animals as a popular and traditional spectacle.

Bullfighting also with its origins before Christ, has lasted to this day with certain changes in some of the countries where it was introduced as a festive cultural event. However, it is very similar to the Roman arena and the confrontation to the death between a man and an animal.

Currently these ¨Cultural Traditions¨ are still practiced in eight countries: Spain, France, Portugal, Mexico, Venezuela, Peru, Colombia and Ecuador.

Will we continue in the 21st century with cruelty towards these animals as a public, popular and traditional celebration, even for underage spectators?

Have we still not reached the degree of civilization necessary to rectify what is archaic in terms of understanding cultural Tradition within the public and festive sphere?

Personally, I believe that it is possible to deal with the Bull without killing him, not hurting him, and above all, with the respect he deserves. Like the Tigers or Lions that are presented in shows in the great Circuses, being a beautiful presentation for both adults and children.

Copyright © 2014/2021 Jose Ney Mila Espinosa.